#

We provide access to justice.#1

For many individuals and companies, pursuing a claim through litigation or arbitration is prohibitively expensive and risky. Our aim is to ensure that people with genuine claims are able to pursue them. In this regard, we have developed a litigation funding solution so that justice is not simply a question of what you can access when you have enough money.

We turn your claim into cash.#2

Litigation is a very risky business and can seriously damage a company’s balance sheet. In financing claims themselves corporations must manage several layers of risk. At Alter Litigation we provide you with a litigation risk transfer solution: we underwrite the cost of litigation and if there is no recovery at the end of the case, our investment is lost and you have no debt to repay. For a funded claimant, a litigation case becomes a valuable financial asset.

We put you on an equal footing.#3

At Alter Litigation, we understand fully the importance of the legal team that assists you in your case. Therefore, not only will we provide you with strategic risk capital but we will also send you to the best legal team available to enable you to litigate on an equal footing. Funded and well-advised you will be able to either hold out for your claim true and fair settlement value or to take your case to trial.

About Third Party Litigation Funding.

Litigation funding is all about access to justice.

For many individuals and companies, pursuing a claim through litigation or arbitration can be prohibitively expensive and risky. Also, insolvency practitioners and lawyers often represent creditors who have suffered losses and do not want to suffer more. Even for those with the ability to pay, the uncertainty regarding both the total cost and the timescale to conclusion can make pursuing a claim an unattractive prospect.

Litigation funding is the provision of financial support to a claimant in a legal case by an unconnected third party in return for a share of the award assuming the case is won. Essentially, a litigation funder provides non-recourse legal finance to claimants in order that they can finance their legal fees and expenses. Claimants have no out-of-pocket expenses at the outset of the case.

Litigation funding also works as a complete transfer of the financial risk associated with pursuing the case: if there is no recovery at the end of the case, the litigation funder’s investment is lost and the claimant has no debt to repay.

Our value proposition.

At Alter Litigation we are committed to Justice.

Many claimants with genuine claims cannot access justice due to a lack of financial resources.

Additionally, far too often, claimants engage in litigation without having carried out the due diligence of the timing and prospects for recovery, thereby spending too much time and money on litigation.

At Alter Litigation, we believe that claims should be treated as corporate assets. This revolutionary approach and the advent of litigation funding will enable companies to hedge their risk and to turn their claims into cash at the soonest on the best terms possible.

In this regard, we have developed innovative solutions that will result in a more efficient and cost-effective use of litigation to resolve disputes.

#1 - we provide access to justice

Our aim is to ensure that people with genuine claims are able to pursue them. In this regard, we have developed a litigation funding solution so that justice is not simply a question of what you can access when you have enough money. We offer to arrange financing for lawyers’ fees, disbursements and expert’s fees in return for a percentage of the damages recovered. There is no set percentage. Alter Litigation charges an agreed percentage of any amount recovered from the legal claim that reflects the risk taken, the size of the claim, the level of costs involved and the duration of the case.

#2 - We turn your claim into cash

Litigation is a very risky business and can seriously damage a company’s balance sheet. In financing claims themselves by paying lawyers hourly fees to litigate a case, corporations must manage several layers of risk such as legal fees exceeding budgets, unfavorable judgments and unforeseen events. At Alter Litigation, we provide you with a litigation hedging solution: we underwrite the cost of litigation and if there is no recovery at the end of the case, our investment is lost and you have no debt to repay. This “no win, no fee” basis enables claimants to hedge their costs in litigation. As a result of funding, the risk profile of pursuing litigation changes significantly and the short-term cash flow position is improved, thereby enabling a more strategic use of capital to create shareholder value. For a funded claimant, a litigation case becomes a valuable financial asset.

#3 - we put you on an equal footing

At Alter Litigation, we understand fully the importance of the legal team that assists you in your case. Therefore, not only will we provide you with strategic risk capital but we will also send you to the best legal team available to enable you to litigate on an equal footing. Funded and well-advised you will be able to either hold out for your claim true and fair settlement value or to take your case to trial.

#4 - we provide a solution which aggregates claims

Sometimes a number of businesses, investors or consumers suffer losses with a common cause. Often, those individual losses are not great enough to justify the costs inherent in using litigation to pursue an individual recovery. However in aggregate those losses can be significant. At Alter Litigation we enable those losses to be recovered for all individuals in the group.

#5 - we provide mediation propositions to boost dispute resolution

At Alter Litigation, we are commercially minded and energized to enable you to turn your claim into cash at the soonest on the best terms possible. Our considerable experience in conflict resolution through mechanisms such as negotiation, mediation and conciliation shows that claimants are often better off if a settlement agreement can be reached. In this regard, we have developed a mediation proposition that involves neutral third parties to boost dispute resolution. However, we are prepared to take cases through to trial if an appropriate settlement cannot be agreed.

#6 - We provide private enforcement solutions that are business minded

At Alter Litigation, we are fully aware of the potential strain on commercial relationships that litigation may have, especially in cases of antitrust disputes and cartel damage claims. In this regard, we have developed innovative market solutions that preserve business relationships without you giving up your rights (see Clemency Xtend)

Cases we fund.

Alter Litigation is able to consider providing litigation financing for a wide spectrum of litigation both in France and Europe, and also international arbitration. Alter Litigation funds cases not only for individuals, companies, public bodies, charities but also group actions and class actions.

commercial disputes

Commercial disputes, corporate litigation including mergers and acquisitions disputes, breaches of fiduciary duty, indemnity and warranty claims, investor claims, shareholder disputes, breaches of contract, misrepresentation claims (corporate misstatements)...

cartel damages claims

Claimants who have suffered from anti-competitive behaviour (both in respect of direct and indirect purchasers) and victims who have been damaged by cartels are often deterred from claiming the damages they are entitled to, faced with the prospect of complex economic damage analysis, litigation costs, financial risks and potential strain on commercial relationships. Damaged companies might therefore - despite the good chances of a successful claim - refrain from the enforcement of damage claims due to real or perceived economic dependencies. At Alter Litigation, we have developed an innovative market solution which we believe delivers effective redress to cartel victims: learn more about our Clemency Xtend program.

arbitration

Alter Litigation is able to consider funding most forms of arbitration. We have a significant expertise in funding commercial arbitration before the ICC (International Chamber of Commerce)

insolvency practitioners

Insolvency practitioners that hold a litigation asset in the form of a strong claim against a party with whom the claimant no longer has a business connection often do not possess sufficient financial resources. Alter Litigation can take on the costs. This enables the legal claim to be pursued for the benefit of the creditors.

We welcome all enquiries and can give a quick assessment of your case. If you are interested, please contact us at contact@alterlitigation.com. For more details, please visit the FAQ’s page.

Clemency XtendTM

Effective redress

How do you turn your cartel damage claims into cash?

Anti-competitive practices have negative effects on the economy as a whole, typically leading to lower output and higher prices of goods and services.

Specifically in the context of cartel activity, victims end up paying more for less.

Despite the increase in private antitrust litigation over the past few years, private enforcement is still greatly underdeveloped. Alter Litigation has developed an innovative market solution aimed at delivering effective redress to cartel victims.

Our solution is the Clemency XtendTM program.

What is a cartel?

A cartel is a group of similar, independent companies which agree to fix prices, limit production or share markets or customers between themselves, instead of competing with each other. As a consequence, their clients (consumers or other businesses) end up paying more in return for lower quality. Cartels are illegal under EU competition rules and French law. The European Commission and the French Competition Authority (as well as other national competition authorities) impose heavy fines on companies involved in cartel activity.
Additionally, cartel members are, by law, obliged to compensate any damage or loss caused by their illegal conduct.

Individual right to compensation

According to the European Court of Justice (decisions in Courage v. Crehan and in Manfredi), any citizen or business which suffers harm as a result of a breach of the EU competition rules (Articles 101 and 102 TFEU) should be able to claim damages for the loss caused.
Compensating victims of cartels is something competition authorities throughout Europe consider is important.

The first advantage of private enforcement is direct justice, which allows the victims of illegal anticompetitive behavior to be compensated for the loss they have suffered.” Commissioner Nellie Kroes, 2005

At Alter Litigation, we consider private actions and Clemency XtendTM as a complementary to the public enforcement regime.

Clemency Xtend: We deliver effective redress

Clemency XtendTM is an innovative market solution developed by Alter Litigation that ensures effective, safe, risk-free and swift redress to cartel victims.
Currently victims of cartels face a host of obstacles in seeking compensation (i.e. cost, risk, lack of evidence and potential strain on ongoing relationships). Victims are therefore discouraged – despite good chances of success – from lodging compensatory private actions against the cartel members.

We solve this via our Clemency XtendTM program.

# 1 We create incentives for cartel members to hand over evidence

Cartels, by their very nature, are secretive. It is therefore intrinsically difficult to prove a breach of competition law due to the practical obstacles (such as access to evidence) and the legal threshold required (i.e. proof of damage and causality). This structural imbalance that ultimately hinders redress has led us to develop Clemency XtendTM which aims to overcome this imbalance.

Clemency XtendTM was inspired by the public leniency program which rewards those cartel members which provide insider informationand evidence of anti-competitive behavior with immunity from fines. Under Clemency XtendTM, the cartel member that provides us with evidence of the competition law infringement is rewarded. In return, Alter Litigation commits (i) to enforcing the cartel damage claims against the other cartel members only and (ii) to assisting the
Clemency Xtend TM candidate to reduce its risk of successful actions for contribution brought by the other cartel members.

The underlying idea behind Clemency XtendTM is to create an environment where cartel members are incentivized to cooperate with us and provide evidence. In order to achieve this goal, we set up the bundling of cartel damage claims in order to conduct a collective legal action. The bundling of claims considerably limits the leverage of cartel members and creates an environment that gets cartel members to provide evidence necessary for the economic substantiation of the alleged damages.

Clemency XtendTM is available to all cartel members, whether or not they have participated in the public leniency program.

# 2 We ensure your ongoing business relationships remain unaffected

Victims often have ongoing business relationships with cartel members and compensatory legal action may cause potential strain on these relationships. Under the Clemency Xtend TM program, we organize, when legally permissible, the assignment of the cartel damage claims from each cartel victim to a single Alter Litigation group company that will act in its name and on its behalf. By selling your cartel damage claim to us, you will not be exposed to the risks inherent in litigation and your business relationships will remain unaffected.

#3 We provide a risk-free litigation funding solution

Cartel victims very often have neither the time nor the money to pursue an action over several years. Moreover, the possible liability for the other side’s legal costs strongly deters victims from seeking remedies through the courts. Alter Litigation offers to arrange financing for lawyers’ fees, disbursements and experts’ fees in return for a percentage of the damages recovered. Our litigation financing works as a hedging solution: if there is no recovery at the end of the case, our investment is lost and you have no debt to repay.

For more information about the Clemency XtendTM program please contact us at: contact@alterlitigation.com

About the funding process.

Here is what Alter Litigation needs to recommend your case for funding.

strong legal merits

We assess the legal merits of the claim. We need to have good supporting evidence of the liability and a clear basis for the claim’s value. Written advice on these issues from your lawyer will expedite our evaluation. It is therefore important that your case has had an initial appraisal of its merits by a lawyer.

Strong defendant creditworthiness

We assess whether the defendant has the ability to satisfy the claim; what is the defendant's asset position; and where those assets are located.

Experienced legal team

A good legal team in place with demonstrable experience in the area of law to which the claim relates. If you are a claimant who has not yet appointed a legal team or are dissatisfied with your current legal advisors, we can recommend the best possible team.

proportionate costs

How much will the claim cost to run? Our decision to fund a case depends on our assessment of the merits and the proportionality between a realistic assessment of claim value and the costs. It goes without saying that every case is unique. Please contact us and we will be happy to give you a quick assessment of your case and help you to be in the best position to satisfy our case criteria.

Events

CROSS-BORDER ENFORCEMENT IN EUROPE

Paris, France

Alter Litigation will held a workshop with top notch law firm FTPA Partners on the recent abolition of exequatur by the Regulation 1215/2012.       More

The free movement of judgments contribute to the establishment of a genuine European area of justice. But what exactly are these new rules on cross-border enforcement in the Brussels I-bis Regulation? How does it affect the enforcement of a judgement in France? How litigation finance can help you to deal with the new enforcement risks and costs?

Less

FRENCH BAR ASSOCIATION

Paris, France

Alter Litigation talked about litigation finance at the French Bar Association.

Program

FRENCH BAR ASSOCIATION ANNUAL MEETING

Montpellier, France

Frédéric Pelouze, founder of Alter Litigation spoke about third party funding in arbitration and litigation during the French Bar Annual Meeting.

Program

FRENCH MINISTRY OF FINANCE – DGCCRF

Paris, France

Alter Litigation held a workshop on the funding of private enforcement cases. VIDEO OF THE EVENT HERE 

Press

FINYEAR

Lawsuit: get it funded

Monsieur Frédéric Pelouze bonjour, vous êtes ancien avocat et co-fondateur d’Alter Ligitation, première société française dédiée au financement de contentieux, pourriez-vous nous présenter votre société et son fonctionnement ?  More / PDF

Notre société est spécialisée dans le financement des litiges. Le financement de litiges est une toute nouvelle industrie en France. En substance, nous finançons l’entier cout d’un litige (contentieux / arbitrage) en l’échange d’une partie des dommages attribués à l’entreprise financée, en cas de succès. 

La société est composée d’une équipe de gestion et d’un collège d’experts externe regroupant d’anciens magistrats, des professeurs de droit, des avocats, des arbitres et des experts en quantification de dommages. 

Lorsqu’une demande de financement nous parvient, nous analysons le bien fondé de l’action en justice, la solvabilité du défendeur ainsi que le montant des dommages réclamés. Nous nous appuyons également sur l’opinion juridique fournie par les conseils du demandeur. Si le client n’a pas d’avocats, nous pouvons l’accompagner dans le choix d’une équipe de conseils la mieux à même de le représenter. 

La décision de financer ou non est prise par l’équipe de gestion sur la base de l’avis collégial des experts. 

Qu’apportez-vous concrètement à un financier d’entreprise ? 

Cela dépend du profil du demandeur. Je dirais qu’il y a deux profils « type ». 

Le premier est celui d’une entreprise qui ne dispose tout simplement pas de la trésorerie suffisante pour engager ou poursuivre une action en justice, dont les chances de succès sont pourtant élevées. Dans ce cas, c’est une pure question pure d’accès au droit : nous fournissons la trésorerie à l’entreprise afin qu’elle puisse se défendre. 

Le second profil est celui d’une entreprise qui n’a pas de problème de trésorerie mais qui souhaite améliorer son profil de risque et optimiser la gestion de ses liquidités. Ces entreprises ont désormais le choix : financer leurs contentieux sur fonds propres ou bénéficier d’un financement hors bilan sans obligation de remboursement. En ayant recours à un financement de son litige par un tiers tel qu’Alter Litigation, l’entreprise va cumule plusieurs avantages :  - La conduite une bataille judiciaire sans impact sur sa trésorerie ;  - L’externalisation du risque adossé au contentieux dans la mesure où elle ne supportera pas le coût en cas d’échec (l’ensemble des sommes que nous mobilisons restent à notre charge)  - La transformation le contentieux en un véritable actif financier à forte valeur ajoutée ; et  - Le redéploiement de sa trésorerie vers des investissements créateurs de valeur pour les actionnaires. 

Enfin et surtout, il permet aussi de mettre sur un pied d’égalité les parties lorsque le rapport de force financier est trop déséquilibré entre elles. 

Comment vous rémunérez-vous ? 

Nous sommes rémunérés uniquement en cas de succès du litige par un pourcentage sur le montant des sommes allouées à notre client : en moyenne 30% des sommes, mais il n’existe pas de pourcentage standard. Ce pourcentage est fonction de plusieurs critères, notamment du montant de l’investissement par rapport au montant des dommages réclamés, de la durée du contentieux et de ses chances de succès. Si le contentieux est perdu, Alter Litigation perd la totalité des sommes engagées et le client n’a rien à rembourser.

Cette activité est-elle un outil de diversification pour les cabinets d’avocat ? 

Pour les avocats le financement de litige est l’opportunité de représenter des clients qu’ils n’auraient pas représentés autrement. Les avocats français n’ayant pas le droit de pratiquer le « no win, no fee » ; les solutions de financement sont donc un relai efficace lorsque leurs clients ayant des droits fondés ne disposent pas des fonds nécessaire pour conduire la procédure. 

Dans un marché en pleine mutation, le financement des procédures est un argument marketing puissant envoyé au client, en attente de solution d’externalisation et d’alignement des intérêts. 

Nous réfléchissons également à de véritables solutions de monétisation des honoraires de résultats des cabinets d’avocats. Ce qui permettrait aux cabinets d’investir cet argent dans d’autres domaines plutôt que de devoir attendre la fin de la procédure. 

Quel type de litige financez vous ? 

Alter Litigation est capable de fournir des solutions de financement sur un large spectre de contentieux en France et en Europe, ainsi que d’arbitrages internationaux. Alter Litigation accompagne aussi bien les entreprises, les particuliers que les entités publiques. 

En pratique il s’agit de l’ensemble des contentieux de nature commerciale et notamment les litiges post fusions-acquisitions, les cas de manquements aux obligations financières, les réclamations en garantie, les réclamations d’investisseurs, les litiges entre actionnaires, les ruptures de contrats et ruptures brutales de relations commerciales établies… 

Plus précisément nous sommes en mesure de financer les contentieux qui concerne le droit de la concurrence. Les victimes de pratiques anticoncurrentielles renoncent souvent à engager des actions en réparation en raison de la complexité de la procédure et de l’analyse économique des dommages, des coûts et de tensions qu’un contentieux avec un partenaire commercial peut potentiellement engendrer. Les victimes choisissent donc bien souvent, en dépit de grandes chances de succès, de ne pas engager d’action civile en réparation du préjudice subi. 

Chez Alter Litigation nous avons donc développé une solution intitulée Clemency Xtend qui offre aux victimes de cartels une réparation effective de leurs préjudices. 

Enfin et surtout, nous sommes très actifs sur les arbitrages commerciaux, qui sont des litiges portés devant un tribunal privé composé d’arbitres nommés par les parties. La compétence des tribunaux arbitraux vient d’un accord contractuel entre les parties. Cet accord s’appelle une clause compromissoire, elle est très fréquemment insérée dans les contrats, notamment lorsque les deux parties ne sont pas de la même nationalité. Les entreprises sont souvent confrontées à ce type de procédures qu’elles connaissent mal et qui coûte extrêmement cher. Sans une équipe de juristes aguerris en son sein, une entreprise n’aura aucune chance de pouvoir mener cette procédure à bien. 

Nous avons une expérience particulière en matière d’arbitrage commercial notamment devant la CCI (Chambre de commerce internationale – http://www.iccwbo.org/). 

Enfin nous pouvons financer les contentieux en matière de procédures collectives. Les professionnels des sociétés en difficultés (mandataires judicaires, liquidateurs) sont souvent confrontés à des problèmes de financement de contentieux : la société en difficulté est engagée dans une situation contentieuse qu’elle ne peut pas ou plus poursuivre faute de moyens financiers alors que ce contentieux pourrait être une source de revenus pour la société et pour les créanciers. Alter Litigation peut mettre en place le financement propre à assurer la poursuite du contentieux.

Less / PDF

DAF MAG

Lawsuit: request funding !

Depuis 2013, Alter Litigation propose aux entreprises de faire financer leurs llitiges par un tiers en échange d’un pourcentage sur les sommes recouvrées. Un moyen d’externaliser le risque et de préserver sa trésorerie. A condition de pouvoir y prétendre. More / PDF

Ancien avocat chez Bredin Prat, Frédéric Pelouze a fondé en 2013 Alter Litigation, la première société française dédiée au financement de contentieux. ” C’est une idée qui est apparue en Australie à la fin des années 1990 et qui se développe en Angleterre depuis environ cinq ans “, souligne-t-il.

Basée à Paris, Alter Litigation propose aux entreprises de faire financer tous les frais liés à un contentieux ou un arbitrage par un tiers, en échange d’un pourcentage (en moyenne 30 à 40 %) sur les sommes recouvrées à l’issue du litige, et ce uniquement en cas de succès. Alter litigation est accompagnée par un comité d’investissement. ” C’est une activité de capital-risque “, résume Frédéric Pelouze.

Créer de la liquidité sur le marché des litiges

Le coeur de cible d’Alter Litigation est constitué de PME-PMI. « Nous travaillons avec deux types de sociétés : celles qui manquent de cash et ne peuvent pas engager de procédure, et les entreprises qui souhaitent externaliser le risque pour se concentrer sur leur core business, précise Frédéric Pelouze. Finalement, nous transformons leur contentieux en option d’achat. Nous faisons d’un litige un actif. »   Est-ce là une tentative de financiarisation du monde de la justice ? « Notre objectif est avant tout de créer de la liquidité sur le marché des litiges » , répond le dirigeant d’Alter Litigation.

Tout le monde ne peut pas prétendre faire financer son litige par un tiers. Pour chaque dossier, Alter Litigation examine quatre critères : les chances de succès, le montant de dommages et intérêt par rapport à l’investissement, l’expertise de l’équipe juridique qui accompagne le client, et la solvabilité de la partie défenderesse. Le tout est passé au peigne fin par un comité qui retoque en moyenne 95 % des dossiers. «  Depuis le lancement de l’activité, nous avons reçus cent-cinquante demandes et en avons financé six » , note Frédéric Pelouze.

Less / PDF

INSOLVENCY PRACTIONNERS FRENCH INSTITUE

A tool for Insolvency Practitioners

Pour les entreprises en redressement ou en liquidation certains contentieux, et a fortiori les arbitrages, sont fortement consommateurs des fonds propres, à tel point qu’ils sont parfois abandonnés faute pour l’entreprise de disposer de la surface financière nécessaire pour en supporter le coût.

Face à l’impossibilité de rendre ces actifs liquides en raison de la menace du retrait litigieux, des solutions de financement de litiges par des tiers sont apparues et permettent la monétisation à terme et sans risque de ces potentiels flux de liquidités que représentent les litiges. More / PDF

Le financement de litiges offre ainsi une solu- tion externalisation du cout d’un litige en demande à travers un financement hors bilan sans obligation de remboursement des frais supportés par le tiers en cas d’échec. Une opportunité pour le mandataire ou le liquidateur d’engager des procédures sans mobilier de trésorerie, tout en conservant la conduite du procès.

INTRODUCTION

L’Europe connait depuis une dizaine années une croissance significative du nombre de litiges en même temps qu’une augmentation remar- quable des coûts y afférents. Cette tendance de fond s’est récemment intensifiée avec la crise économique.

La conjugaison de ce contexte structurel accéléré par la conjoncture a contribué à accentuer les déséquilibres entre entreprises in bonis et entreprises en difficultés, au détriment des plus faibles. A tel point que la surface financière d’une entreprise est devenue déterminante, surtout en arbitrage, pour faire valoir ses droits en justice.

Les entreprises en difficultés, qui sont de plus en plus nombreuses, sont trop souvent contraintes de gérer leurs litiges au rabais ou même d’abandonner les poursuites, faute de moyens.

Alors même que ces litiges sont pour l’entre- prise de véritables actifs dont les liquidités qu’ils peuvent générer peuvent être significatives, le financement de ces procédures conten- tieuses reste, pour les professionnels en charge d’accompagner ces entreprises, un problème souvent délicat à résoudre. Dans ce contexte,des solutions de financement de litiges par des tiers ont récemment émergé avec la promesse que ces entreprises peuvent désormais faire valoir leurs droits sans mobiliser leur trésorerie.

1. Le litige, cet actif non transférable et illiquide

D’une manière générale, les problèmes de trésorerie conduisent les entreprises qui y sont confrontées à céder certains de leurs actifs afin d’améliorer leur ratio de solvabilité dans la perspective notamment d’un refinancement.

Les litiges en demande représentent un des rares actifs de l’entreprise qui, de par leur nature et l’environnement législatif en vigueur, n’est pas inscrit au bilan et ne dispose pas de solution de liquidité.

1.1. Le retrait litigieux, obstacle à la libre négociabilité des litiges

Les entreprises et a fortiori les entreprises en difficultés, pourraient être tentées de « céder » certains litiges en demande nonobstant l’aléa dont ils sont frappés. La cession d’un litige représenterait pour l’entreprise l’opportunité :

- de monétiser immédiatement la valeur pon- dérée du flux de liquidités que ces litiges en demande peuvent générer dans le futur ;

- et de libérer les entreprises d’un actif consommateur de fonds propres dans la mesure où tout litige nécessite des liquidités pour conduire la procédure.

A l’instar d’une cession de créance, la cession d’un litige à un tiers permettrait donc à l’entreprise de renforcer ses fonds propres, de financer son fonds de roulement ou de pouvoir retrouver des capacités de prêt.

Cependant, les dispositions les dispositions de l’article 1699 du code civil relatives au retrait litigieux anéantissent l’attractivité pour le ces- sionnaire de procéder à l’acquisition d’un droit litigieux. En vertu de ces dispositions, le débiteur cédé – adversaire du cédant – peut contrarier la cession des droits litigieux, en exerçant le retrait que la loi lui réserve : en versant au cessionnaire le prix effectif de la cession, les frais éventuels du contrat et les intérêts au taux légal, le débiteur cédé devient retrayant et le cessionnaire, devenu retrayé, ne peut plus continuer le procès et la dette s’éteint par confusion.

Par ce mécanisme, le débiteur cédé peut racheter sa propre dette à un prix a priori inférieur à sa valeur, la créance cédée faisant l’objet d’une contestation. Dans la mesure où l’acceptation du cessionnaire à cette substitution n’est aucunement requise, le mécanisme du retrait rend purement et simplement la cession des droits litigieux financièrement très peu attractive pour les cessionnaires. L’exercice du retrait requiert toutefois qu’il s’agisse effectivement d’une créance de nature litigieuse au sens de l’article 1700 du code civil qui dispose à cet égard que : « la chose est censée litigieuse dès qu’il y a procès et contestation sur le fond du droit ». En visant la « contestation sur le fond du droit », la loi exige que le droit concerné fasse l’objet d’une négation ou d’une remise en cause. Dès lors que la créance n’est contestée ni dans son existence, ni dans son quantum mais que la contestation ne porte que sur la seule qualité du cédant à agir, le seul calcul des intérêts, ou l’exécution d’une décision, ou encore sur l’incertitude qui existe sur le recouvrement de la créance, la créance n’est pas litigieuse au sens des dispositions précitées et peut donc être cédée sans possibilité de retrait. Dans ces cas- là, l’entreprise n’est certainement pas confrontée à un véritable litige et elle aura sans doute intérêt à en assurer seule la gestion.

Contrairement à un portefeuille de créances que les entreprises peuvent mobiliser à travers les solutions d’affacturages, la loi prohibe donc indirectement la cession de droits litigieux.

1.2. L’aléa, obstacle à la liquidité

A première vue, il est permit de s’étonner que la valeur d’un litige en demande ne soit quasiment jamais utilisée comme assiette, garantie ou sous-jacent pour obtenir d’un tiers des liqui- dités.

A l’examen, il faut concéder que la difficulté d’appréhender les différentes inconnues de l’équation à laquelle répond l’aléa de tout li- tige, participe à rendre cet actif difficile à valo- riser pour un non spécialiste. En effet, ce travail de modélisation est très particulier et nécessite de mobiliser des outils et des connaissances spécifiques.

Si le principe de prudence comptable interdit d’inscrire la valeur pondérée d’un litige à l’actif du bilan, l’aversion au risque et les compétences requises pour valoriser ces actifs expliquent en partie le peu d’engouement vis-à-vis des litiges.

Il n’en reste pas moins que ces litiges sont d’un point de vue strictement financier des actifs. Et que de surcroit, ils exigent de leur propriétaire qu’il engage des sommes parfois significatives afin de conduire une procédure en supportant le risque d’un échec.

C’est dans ce contexte de restriction légale à la négociabilité vis-à-vis d’un actif communément perçu comme risqué que sont nées certaines innovations financières et juridiques qui offrent désormais aux professionnels des entreprises en difficultés des opportunités intéressantes pour monétiser les litiges.

2. Le financement de litiges : le début de la monétisation des litiges

Le financement de litiges consiste à faire fi- nancer par un tiers aux parties à la procédure contentieuse, tous les frais liés à ce litige en échange d’un pourcentage sur les sommes recouvrées uniquement en cas de succès.

Il s’agit d’une solution inédite de monétisation non immédiate des droits litigieux et d’exter- nalisation des couts et des risques qui y sont adossés.

En effet, ayant recours à un tiers financeur de litiges, l’entreprise va pouvoir : (i) bénéficier d’un audit de son litige et (ii) le cas échéant conduire une bataille judiciaire (a) sans impact sur sa trésorerie, (b) en externalisant le risque adossé au litige (c) au profit d’un redéploiement sa trésorerie vers les activités cœur de l’entreprise.

2.1. Bénéficier de l’expertise d’un tiers en matière de valorisation du litige

La pratique du financement de litige a conduit les tiers financeurs à modéliser les litiges au regard d’un certain nombre de critères prédé- finis afin d’en extraire une valeur pondérée des risques et du temps nécessaire au recouvrement.

Certaines situations contentieuses sont rela- tivement simples ; d’autres en revanche sont complexes et nécessitent de conduire en amont un audit juridique pointu afin d’établir le bien- fondé juridique et les chances de succès des demandes.

A cet égard, la justification par les parties du quantum des dommages réclamés, dont l’exi- gence des juges à cet égard ne cesse de croitre, requiert désormais de plus en plus souvent de mobiliser des outils de valorisation sophistiqués et coûteux.

L’appréciation du risque de contrepartie re- quiert également qu’un audit sur la solvabilité du défendeur et que des travaux d’investigation soient le cas échéant engagés, afin de localiser des actifs notamment pour déjouer des sché- mas visant par exemple à organiser l’insolvabilité du débiteur.

Bien souvent, les entreprises, peu équipées en interne et fortement mobilisées par les affaires opérationnelles, renoncent à conduire cette analyse juridique.

Ces nombreux obstacles les conduisent à ne pas réaliser ce travail de valorisation ou à abandonner le recouvrement de litiges jugés trop risqués qu’il aurait été pourtant judicieux de poursuivre depuis le début et inversement.

Un tiers financeur conduira systématiquement ce travail de modélisation indispensable à une prise de décision éclairée. En sollicitant un tiers financeur, l’entreprise bénéficie gratuitement d’une information déterminante dans le processus de décision qui la conduit à arbitrer entre engager sur fonds propres une procédure contentieuse ou en externaliser le cout et le risque à travers un financement hors-bilan.

2.2. Convertir en liquidités un litige, sans trésorerie et sans risque

2.2.1. Un financement hors bilan sans obligation de remboursement

L’opération de financement de litiges n’est pas une opération de prêt. Il s’agit d’une opération d’investissement ou le tiers financeur supporte l’entier coût du litige en contrepartie d’une partie des dommages-intérêts en cas de succès.

En cas de perte du litige, l’investissement du tiers est perdu et l’entreprise n’a aucune dette à payer. En tant que solution de financement hors bilan elle s’avère extrêmement intéressante notamment pour les entreprises confrontées à des difficultés de trésorerie.

2.2.2. Une couverture de risque en cas d’insolvabilité du défendeur

L’insolvabilité du défendeur est un risque auquel font face tous les demandeurs à l’instance. Ce risque est souvent difficile à apprécier et en pratique rarement intégré dans l’étude de l’opportunité d’engager des poursuites que conduisent les demandeurs avec leurs avocats. Si le risque d’insolvabilité est incontournable, il est en revanche possible de l’externaliser. En effet, l’opération de financement agit comme une véritable couverture de risque contre l’insolvabilité du défendeur à hauteur des frais engagés dans la mesure où la défaillance du débiteur n’aura aucun impact sur la trésorerie de l’entreprise demanderesse.

2.2.3. Une couverture de risque contre une condamnation aux frais de la partie adverse

Le contrat de financement stipule généralement qu’en cas d’échec de la procédure, les frais de la partie adverse auxquels le demandeur pourrait être condamné seront supportés par le tiers financeur.

En matière d’arbitrage, il est très fréquent que la partie qui succombe soit condamnée à payer à la partie qui triomphe les frais que cette dernière a engagés pour faire valoir ses droits. Ces montants peuvent parfois être subséquents et venir grever substantiellement la trésorerie d’une entreprise. L’opération de financement agit là encore comme une véritable couverture de risque contre le risque de condamnation aux frais de la partie adverse.

2.2.4. La maîtrise de la conduite du procès

Le financement de litiges consiste en un soutien financier et non en une assistance juridique extérieure. Le recours à un financement par un tiers n’entrave donc pas la liberté de choix de l’avocat. Le mandataire ou le liquidateur conservera donc seul, avec l’appui de l’avocat, la conduite du procès. Il s’agit d’une situation bien différente de celle où l’assureur conduit la procédure et choisit les avocats.

* * *

L’activité de financement de litige, apparue récemment en France, est amenée à se développer notamment vis-à-vis des professionnels des entreprises en difficultés dont la contrainte budgétaire est souvent le talon d’Achille d’une procédure contentieuse.

Less / PDF

AGEFI

Funding for legal claims : a business

En matière de litiges, l’environnement est marqué par plusieurs tendances de fond que la conjoncture a nettement accéléré. Tout d’abord, les entreprises Européennes font face depuis une dizaine d’années à une croissance assez significative du nombre de litiges notamment commerciaux conjuguée à une augmentation remarquable des coûts y afférents.

Dans un tel contexte, les entreprises ayant peu l’expérience des gros contentieux et/ou faisant face à de sévères contraintes bud- gétaires se retrouvent démunies face aux grands groupes qui disposent notamment d’équipes internes dédiées à la gestion de ces contentieux. Cela conduit celles-ci à trop souvent gérer leurs litiges au rabais ou à même abandonner les poursuites, faute de moyens. Les grands groupes ne sont pas en reste. Le financement de ces procédures litigieuses longues et coûteuses est devenu une préoccupation majeure des directeurs financiers en raison de bud- gets souvent imprévisibles et d’un aléa judiciaire important. Les directeurs juridiques, dont la place et les responsabilités au sein de l’entreprise sont croissantes, sont contraints par des budgets ser- rés et deviennent de plus en plus exigeants vis-à-vis des cabinets d’avocats. Ces derniers sont en conséquence incités à réinventer leur modèle et notamment la facturation au taux horaire qui a de moins en moins la faveur des donneurs d’ordre qui privilégient de plus en plus les solutions qui favorise un alignement des inté- rêts et optent pour une externalisation des taches à faible valeur ajoutée. Pourtant, les litiges sont pour l’entreprise de véritables actifs dont les liquidités qu’ils peuvent générer peuvent être signi- ficatives. C’est dans ce contexte qu’une offre de finance de litiges a récemment émergé avec notamment comme but que les entreprises puissent désormais faire valoir leurs droits sans mobiliser de trésorerie. Explication avec le créateur de la société Alter Litigation, Frédéric PELOUZE. 

Comment avez-vous décidé de formuler une offre de finance de litiges?

L’ADN de la finance de litige réside dans le fait d’appréhender les litiges comme une véritable classe d’actifs à part entière. A travers cette approche rationalisée les parties procèdent à une véritable modélisation qui permet d’aboutir à une valorisation des litiges au regard d’un certain nombre de critères prédéfinis. Bien qu’il s’agisse d’un actif particulier, les entreprises et a fortiori les en- treprises en difficultés pourraient être tentées de «céder» certains de leurs litiges en demande nonobstant l’aléa qui en affecte la va- leur. Cet «affacturage» des litiges représenterait pour l’entreprise l’opportunité de monétiser immédiatement la valeur pondérée du flux de liquidités que ces litiges en demande peuvent générer dans le futur. Et également, de libérer les entreprises d’un actif consommateur de fonds propres (tout litige nécessite des liquidités pour conduire la procédure) et de ressources humaines.

A l’instar d’une cession de créance, la cession d’un litige à un tiers permettrait donc à l’entreprise de renforcer ses fonds propres, de financer son fonds de roulement ou de pouvoir retrouver des capacités de prêt. Néanmoins, les dispositions les dispositions de l’article 1699 du code civil français relatives au retrait litigieux anéantissent l’attractivité pour le cessionnaire de procéder à l’ac- quisition d’un droit litigieux. C’est dans ce contexte que sont nées des solutions inédites de financement.

Comment fonctionnez-vous exactement?

La finance de litige, offre aux plaignants, aux entreprises, aux cabinets d’avocats et aux mandataires et liquidateurs judiciaires une batterie de solutions dédiées comprenant notamment le financement hors bilan des procédures, l’externalisation des risques et des solutions de monétisation.

Dans sa forme la plus basique, la finance de litige consiste en un financement par un tiers aux parties à la procédure litigieuse, de tous les frais liés à ce litige en échange d’un pourcentage sur les sommes recouvrées uniquement en cas de succès. Véritable in- vestissement du tiers financeur qui supporte l’entier coût du litige en contrepartie d’une partie des dommages et intérêts en cas de succès, cette opération n’a rien d’un prêt. En cas d’échec de la procédure, l’investissement du tiers est perdu et l’entreprise n’a aucune dette à payer. Cette solution offre pour la première fois aux entreprises de choisir entre financer leurs litiges sur fonds propres ou bénéficier d’un financement hors bilan sans obligation de remboursement.Toute décision d’investissement étant précédée d’un audit poussé, l’entreprise bénéficie d’un audit gratuit de son litige, ce qui devrait inciter les entreprises à quasiment toujours explorer cette option afin de conduire un arbitrage rationnel sur l’opportunité de financer la procédure sur fonds propres.

En matière de risque d’insolvabilité du défendeur au litige, l’opération de financement agit comme une véritable couverture à hauteur des frais engagés dans la mesure où l’insolvabilité du débiteur n’aura aucun impact sur la trésorerie de l’entreprise financée. L’opération de financement agit encore comme une véritable couverture de risque contre le risque de condamnation aux fais de la partie adverse auxquels la partie qui succombe est souvent condamnée et dont les sommes peuvent être significatives surtout en arbitrage.

Financée, l’entreprise peut alors redéployer les liquidités qui auraient du être mobilisées pour la procédure vers les activités cœur de l’entreprise et créatrices de valeur pour les actionnaires. De plus, pour un grand nombre d’entreprises, les frais et les risques liés à un contentieux ou à une procédure d’arbitrage représentent un obstacle souvent très dissuasif à l’engagement de poursuites judiciaires. En permettant la levée de la contrainte budgétaire, le financement des procédures opère un rééquilibrage des moyens mis à disposition des parties ce qui permet in fine d’engager des actions méritantes, ce qui est économiquement efficient. En ma- tière d’arbitrage, la justice privée se finance donc sur le marché privé, ce qui est plutôt sain.

Et si les départements juridiques devenaient des centres de profit?

Les entreprises qui disposent des fonds propres suffisants sont de plus en plus intéressées par les solutions de finance de litiges. C’est une opportunité de transformer un portefeuille de litiges en demande en de véritables options qui ne peuvent que générer un résultat supérieur ou égal à zéro et dont le coût de l’option est en fait nul. Nous réfléchissons également à des solutions de monétisation des décisions de justice rendues qui permettrait également aux entreprises de ne pas avoir à conduire les procédures de recouvrement notamment lorsqu’il faut mobiliser des compétences d’intelligence économique pour engager des procédures de localisation et réalisation des actifs dans des pays étrangers.

Tout ceci sans dessaisissement ! Le financement de litiges consiste en un soutien financier et non en une assistance juridique exté- rieure. Le recours à un financement par un tiers n’entrave donc pas la liberté de choix de l’avocat et l’entreprise conserve, avec l’appui de son avocat, la conduite du procès. En cela, il s’agit d’une situation bien différente de celle où l’assureur conduit la procé- dure et choisit les avocats.

Peut-on considérer cette activité comme un outil de diversification pour les cabinets d’avocat?

Pour les avocats, le financement de litiges est l’opportunité de re- présenter des clients qu’ils n’auraient autrement pas représentés. Les avocats français étant interdits de pratiquer le «no win no fee», les solutions de financement sont un relais efficace lorsque leurs clients ayant des droits fondés ne disposent pas des fonds nécessaires. Dans un marché en pleine mutation, le financement des procédures est un argument marketing puissant envoyé aux clients en attente de solution d’externalisation et d’alignement des intérêts. Nous envisageons des solutions de monétisation des honoraires de résultat à venir des cabinets d’avocats. Ce qui permettrait aux cabinets d’investir cet argent dans d’autres domaines plutôt que d’attendre la fin des procédures.

Vos services ne favorisent ils pas également les créanciers des sociétés en diffculté?

Oui. Les liquidités indispensables à la poursuite des procédures sont également dans l’intérêt des créanciers. Notre offre rencon- tre un accueil très favorable et prometteur auprès des profession- nels des entreprises en difficultés, dont la contrainte budgétaire représente le talon d’Achille d’une procédure contentieuse.

Finalement, pourquoi financer des litiges?

Pour les investisseurs, les contentieux représentent une nouvelle classe d’actifs très attractive. L’environnement actuel, qui conju- gue volatilité, incertitude et convergence, contribue sans surprise à générer chez les investisseurs un très fort appétit pour des inves- tissements décolérés de l’économie globalisée. A ce titre, les litiges représentent certainement une des opportunités d’investissement les plus prometteuses, notamment en raison de leur très forte per- méabilité aux évènements macro économiques. Les portefeuilles de litiges ont l’avantage de comporter des investissements aux maturités variées et dont les débouclages peuvent intervenir à des intervalles très différents ce qui assure aux investisseurs des retours constants.

La capacité de l’équipe de gestion à conduire un audit solide des dossiers permet de correctement circonscrire le risque et de le diversifier à travers une politique d’investissement basée sur la di- versification en termes de nombre, de taille et de type de litiges. Sur- tout, les retours sur investissements ne sont pas directement contingents du montant investi. Le retour sur investissement consistera souvent en un pourcentage des sommes récupérées par le demandeur, assorti de règles de priorités de distribution favorables.

Less / PDF

COMMERCIAL DISPUTE RESOLUTION

Funding Anti-Cartel Cases

A draft European Directive on private competition actions has warned the funders of such claims to stay away. But they’re up for a fight. Edward Machin reports. More / PDF

European competition law often gives prosaic names to instances of widespread corporate wrongdoing: the bathroom fittings cartel; the candle wax case; the gas cartel. Yet behind such nomenclature often lies huge penalties for anti-competitve behavior by the continent’s largest companies.

The European Commission, the EU’s executive arm, has issued EUR 8 billion in fines since 2008, in 39 successful prosecutions. For most European citizens, however, recouping competition damages from member states court has proven incredibly difficult, if not impossible.

The Commission is now looking to change that.

In June 2013, it proposed a Directive on damages actions for breaches of EU completion law, citing shortcoming in member state’s legal framework that has made it « excessively costly and difficult »  to bring actions.

« Infringements of the antitrust rules cause serious harm to European consumers and businesses, »  said the Commission’s vice-president, Joaquín Almunia, the man responsible for EU competition policy, when announcing the legislation.

« We must ensure that all victims of these infringements can obtain redress for the harm they suffered, especially once a competition authority has found and sanctioned such a breach, »  Almunia added.

« It is true that the right to claim compensation before national courts exists in all EU member states, but businesses and citizens are not always able to exercise it practice. [This] proposal seeks to remove these obstacles. »

Great news for those who suffer at the hands of big business – if they’re paying attention, that is. “This development is certainly going to foster the awareness of victims of competition and cartel abuses,” says Frédéric Pelouze, who left Bredin Prat in April 2012 to found Alter Litigation Funding in Paris. « After all, most people don’t check whether the EU or a national competition authority has decided that a cartel acted unlawfully. With greater awareness comes a market for claims, »  he adds.

There’s just one snag: the Commission says it doesn’t want third party funders bankrolling competition actions. That hasn’t stopped at least a dozen companies offering to fund mass claims in Europe – from Omni Bridgeway and East West Debt in The Netherlands, to Claims Funding International in Ireland and Calunius Capital in London. All are active in the competition space, whose principal player, Brussels-headquartered Cartel Damages Claims, is currently pursuing five damages actions across Europe worth EUR 500 million.

Such developments haven’t gone unnoticed by Antoine Winckler, a partner at Cleary Gottlieb in Brussels who specialises in European competition law. But while Winckler says consumer-focused organisations across the continent have also been buying up claims, with those in Germany and Belgium showing a particular appetite for cartel cases, commercial funders are still met with suspicion.

« The EU draft Directive frets about funding and the potential for abusive claims, but I don’t see why these types of actions should be treated differently, »  says Susan Dunn, co-founder of Harbour Litigation Funding, a UK-based funder which has backed class action suits in Europe, Canada and New Zealand. Moreover, the businesses accused of cartel behaviour are generally larger and more sophisticated than the average defendant, meaning that « if the claim was being run improperly their lawyers would find that out immediately, »  says Dunn.

Other funders say they are helping to combat widespread European cartel activity, thereby ensuring better corporate behaviour. Peter Koutsoukis, Claims Funding International’s managing director, explains that the attraction of funding cartel claims is twofold: a «  decent return on investment, »  but also « establishing a deterrent to cartel behaviour. »  Koutsoukis, who has spent nearly three decades at leading Australian claimant firm Maurice Blackburn, which is « indirectly associated »  with CFI, adds: « The level of cartel activity in Europe compared to other places is scandalous. We suspect that this is partly due to companies’ knowledge that victims have no means of redress

Show me the money

Funders are attracted to competition cases because they’re more likely to settle than individual commercial actions. To that end, Joaquin Almunia recently predicted that «  around half »  of the Commission’s cartel cases would ultimately be settled. Yet only 25% of competition infringements found by the Commission in the last seven years have been followed by civil actions. That means there’s no shortage of victims for the funders to befriend.

The defendants in such cases have strategies of their own, however. According to Winckler, lawyers for the cartel members will attempt to disqualify the claim by demonstrating that
that the funder has not directly sustained damage, or that the acquisition of the claim is invalid. « Specific arguments that wouldn’t otherwise exist, but the substance doesn’t change, »  he says.

Ombline Ancelin agrees. An EU competition and regulatory partner at Simmons & Simmons in Paris, Ancelin says « there would be a strategic point to be made »  that the national representative organisations which can bring claims on behalf of consumers may not have the financial resources to run a lengthy litigation process to its end. She notes that of the six associations representing consumers in France, only two have deep enough pockets to bring a claim.

That’s not a problem for the private financing firms, many of which have hundreds of millions of euros to invest in a range of commercial claims, including the competition matters they see as particularly attractive. « The budget for every case we fund extends to the end of trial. We don’t make exceptions just because, statistically speaking, competition cases settle more often, » says Susan Dunn.

More of the same

Whatever the Commission’s feelings on litigation funders, they’re clearly in it for the long haul. As are private competition and class action claims. The Commission said in June that
its latest Directive aims to remove « all practical obstacles to compensation for all victims of infringements of EU competition law, »  whether the action is individual or collective.

Ancelin «  definitely expects »  to see more class actions, given
the « tremendous push by competition authorities in Europe to encourage private enforcement »  against blue chips and SMEs alike. « There is a clear view by most member states that class actions
are a good thing, but they are being very cautious about how they implement the regime so it doesn’t end up like in the US, »  she adds.

Although litigation finance is established to varying degrees in England, Germany, Ireland, Poland and Switzerland, it’s by no means a pan-European development. For example, the pending French class action Bill – which is expected to be introduced by the end of the year, and applies only to consumer claims – makes no mention of funding. Pelouze thinks that’s a mistake, given that his industry provides a « great tool »  to enable consumers to receive access to justice. That premise has long been accepted in Australia, whose litigation funding and class action industries are arguably the world’s most advanced (see article on page 52).

« The Commission is implementing this class action regime as a deterrent to public enforcement. But there are still cartels, because the cartel members continue to make money from them, »  Pelouze explains. « How do you make it more appealing? By making it easier for victims to receive damages. And how do you do that? By creating a market for justice to ensure those claims can be brought. Third-party funding is a very important tool in that landscape, because if you don’t have the money you can’t get the damages. » 

« If this Directive is adopted there will likely be a development in funding, »  says Cleary Gottlieb’s Winckler. « There have been a number of organisations launching in Europe to finance these claims, meaning this is bound to be an area of growth. »

Pelouze remains circumspect. He notes that many lawyers in continental Europe aren’t yet convinced about the merits of funding competition claims. But that’s hardly a surprise. « The top-notch law firms represent the cartel members; and even if they don’t, they’ll likely be conflicted because they represent the corporation in transactional matters, »  Pelouze says. « I tell them that more victims will be coming forward, some of whom will be funded. They tell me that they’ll wait and see. »

Less / PDF

THE ECONOMIST

Chasseurs d’ambulances: Class-action suits are coming to Europe

FOR years French governments have promised to permit class-action lawsuits. But French businesses hate the idea and besides, who wants to copy the Americans? Now, however, François Hollande and his Socialists may allow such suits, if a bill on consumer rights presented to the Council of Ministers on May 2nd is adopted in anything like its present form.

This has upset people who fear that ambulance-chasing and colossal damages are invading Europe. But that is not what Mr Hollande has in mind. This is to be class action à la française, or, as its fans prefer to call it, “action de groupe”.

More / PDF

The point of collective action is to enable people who have been injured by the same wrongful behaviour, but are unlikely to be compensated much individually, to pool their costs to secure redress. The risk is that the scales will be so tipped towards the claimant (as they are in America, through contingency fees and punitive damages) that lawyers can force blameless defendants to settle. Since 1992 France has tiptoed between the two, with a form of collective representation so restrictive that only a handful of cases have relied on it.

Class conscious

“Group actions” would strengthen consumers’ hands a bit. With a few dossiers, a consumer association could bring a case on behalf of all those who had suffered the same injury. A judge would decide on its merits, and set damages or devise a formula for them. The decision would be publicised, and members of the class given time to come forward, and also to opt out. But only associations would be allowed to bring such suits. Only consumer and antitrust cases would be eligible. And only financial damage, not physical or emotional harm, would be taken into account.

Other countries in Europe are interested in extending collective redress too, in part because American judges have taken to kicking out non-American claimants from suits against non-American companies filed in the United States. Around 20 EU members permit some sort of collective action to seek compensation, the European Commission says.

The pace is picking up. Italy and Poland climbed aboard in 2010; Malta in 2012. Germany recently extended a temporary law passed in 2005 to facilitate a case brought by disgruntled Deutsche Telekom shareholders. Belgium’s consumer-affairs minister has produced a class-action proposal for debate. And the commission, which asked for views on collective action in 2011, plans to say more about it soon.

Amsterdam and London are vying to be the favoured venue for hearing cross-border disputes. Anne Maréchal, a lawyer with DLA Piper in Paris, points to the legally binding class-action-style settlements that have developed in the Netherlands since 2005. Claimants can negotiate on behalf of an entire class, as long as a few are Dutch and a foundation is set up under Dutch law. The Amsterdam Appeals Court reviews the settlement, class members have a chance to opt out and the agreement has the force of law. The most recent big-ticket settlement involved a non-Dutch defendant—Converium Holding, a Swiss insurer—in a dispute with mainly Swiss and British shareholders.

London is loth to be left behind. In January the British government proposed opt-out class-action suits in competition cases. Third-party litigation funds, which raise money for suits from investors, crossed from Australia and America to Britain several years ago. Australia’s biggest such fund, IMF, is now eyeing the Netherlands, and Europe’s newest, Alter Litigation, was launched in February—in France.

Less / PDF

MAGAZINE MONITEUR

Financer les contentieux en l’échange d’un pourcentage de l'indemnisation

Frédéric PELOUZE, ancien avocat, a créé début 2013 Alter Litigation, société de financement de contentieux. Une première en France. More / PDF

LA SEMAINE DU DROIT

Litigation finance: access to justice

Créé début 2013 Alter Litigation est la première société dédiée au litigation funding ou third party funding (TPF), solution qui permet aux justiciables de faire financer les frais liés à leur contentieux. Un mode de financement qui se veut un moyen privilégié d’accès à la justice autant pour les particuliers que pour les entreprises. L’un des intérêts de cette solution, nous expose son fondateur Me Frédéric Pelouze, est de ne pas avoir à mobiliser de trésorerie et de ne pas supporter le coût en cas d’échec de la procédure contentieuse engagée. Qu’en est-il ?    More / PDF

La Semaine Juridique, Édition générale : Vous venez de créer la première société de financement de contentieux. En quoi consiste le financement de contentieux ?

Frédéric Pelouze : Le financement de contentieux consiste à faire financer par un tiers au litige, tous les frais liés à ce contentieux en échange d’un pourcentage sur les sommes recouvrées à l’issue du litige, et ce uniquement en cas de succès. Le financement de contentieux par un tiers (TPF) est donc avant tout un moyen privilégié d’accès à la justice.

JCP G : Vous êtes un précurseur en France dans ce domaine. D’où vient ce type de solution ? 

F. P. : Le TPF (entendu strictement comme activité de venture capital) est né il y a une quinzaine d’années en Australie avant de se développer aux États-Unis et en Grande-Bretagne. Historiquement, l’environnement légal en Australie et en Grande-Bretagne a longtemps été hostile au TPF ; en particulier les dispositions de Common law qui codifiaient les délits de maintenance (aide apportée à un tiers, en argent ou par d’autres moyens, en vue d’un procès dans lequel on n’est pas impliqué) et de champerty (concours d’un tiers à une partie en l’échange d’une participation aux bénéfices).

Depuis, le cadre règlementaire est devenu plus accommodant et un marché a pu naître jusqu’à devenir assez robuste en Australie. Il est en revanche trop tôt pour dire que le TPF est devenu monnaie courante dans la mesure où il ne représenterait que 0,1 % du marché du contentieux en volume par an en Australie. De la même manière en Grande-Bretagne le TPF reste marginal. C’est un marché naissant et fragile.

En France, l’accès à la justice reste indéniablement difficile pour beaucoup d’entreprises. Dans un contexte de croissance significative du nombre de contentieux et d’augmentation des coûts, les déséquilibres entre entreprises risquent encore de s’accentuer, et ce au détriment des plus faibles. Disposer d’une surface financière est souvent déterminant, surtout en arbitrage. Le TPF c’est la promesse que les entreprises ne doivent plus renoncer à faire valoir leurs droits par crainte de ne pas être en mesure de pouvoir financer la procédure.

JCP G : Quels sont les types de contentieux concernés par votre financement ? 

F. P. : Essentiellement, les arbitrages ; les contentieux commerciaux et les actions en indemnisation à la suite de pratiques anticoncurrentielles. Nous avons à ce jour déjà reçu 5 demandes de financement, concernant essentiellement des arbitrages.

JCP G : Existe-t-il un profil type de demandeur ?

F. P. : Je dirais qu’il y a deux profils « type ».

Le premier est celui d’une entreprise qui ne dispose tout simplement pas de la trésorerie suffisante et dont les chances de succès sont élevées. Dans ce cas, c’est une pure question d’accès à la justice.

Le second est celui d’une entreprise qui souhaite améliorer son profil de risque et optimiser sa trésorerie. Ces entreprises ont désormais le choix : financer leurs contentieux sur fonds propres ou bénéficier d’un financement hors bilan sans obligation de remboursement. En ayant recours au TPF, l’entreprise va pouvoir : (i) conduire une bataille judiciaire sans impact sur sa trésorerie, (ii) externaliser le risque adossé au contentieux dans la mesure où elle ne supportera pas le coût en cas d’échec (l’ensemble des sommes mobilisées par le funder restant à sa charge), (iii) transformer le contentieux en un actif financier à forte valeur ajoutée et (iv) redéployer sa trésorerie vers des investissements créateurs de valeur pour les actionnaires.

Prenons un exemple : Imaginons qu’une entreprise n’ait d’autre choix que devoir engager une procédure arbitrale pour recouvrer 10 millions ; que les chances de succès soient évaluées à 70 % et les coûts de chaque partie à 2 millions d’euros ; que la partie défaillante doive rembourser les coûts de la partie adverse ; et qu’Alter Litigation se propose de financer la procédure en échange d’une rémunération de 30 % sur l’ensemble des sommes recouvrées en cas de succès. L’entreprise a deux options :

Option A un financement sur fonds propres : en pareille situation l’entreprise n’a d’autre choix que de dépenser 2 millions à t0. L’entreprise a donc à t0 un actif contingent d’une valeur de 8,4 millions (ACfp = (10 + 2) x 0,7) et un passif contingent de 0,6 million (PCfp= 2 x 0,3) ; ou

Option B un financement par Alter Litigation : dans ce cas, l’entreprise ne dépense rien et possède un actif contingent d’une valeur de 4,9 millions (ACTPF(10 – 3) x 0,7).

Sans notre solution, l’entreprise a une amplitude de risque qui va de -4 millions (perte de l’arbitrage) à 10 millions (en cas de succès). Autrement dit, l’entreprise met 4 millions en risque pour, en contrepartie, espérer en gagner 10. Avec notre solution, l’entreprise risque 0 et pourra espérer gagner 7 millions.

Pour les entreprises qui ont rarement l’expérience du contentieux, qui ne disposent pas d’équipes dédiées en interne et de la surface financière nécessaire, le TPF peut se révéler une opportunité extrêmement intéressante.

JCP G : Ce type de demande de financement pourrait-il se réaliser dans le cadre d’une action de groupe ?

F. P. : C’est parfaitement envisageable. Il arrive parfois qu’un grand nombre de sociétés ou d’investisseurs subissent un préjudice ayant une même cause. En matière financière ou de pratiques anticoncurrentielles par exemple. Nous avons à ce titre développé un programme dédié à l’indemnisation des victimes de cartels : Clemency Xtend est la première solution privée globale, inspirée du programme public de clémence, qui permet aux victimes directes de cartels de se regrouper pour agir collectivement.

JCP G : Comment est organisée Alter Litigation ? Qui fait quoi ?

F. P. : La société est composée d’une équipe de gestion et d’un collège d’experts externe regroupant anciens magistrats, professeurs de droit, avocats, arbitres et experts en quantification de dommages.

La phase 1 de l’audit consiste en un premier examen du contentieux par l’équipe de gestion afin d’analyser les fondements juridiques de l’action, la solvabilité du défendeur et le montant des dommages réclamés. À ce stade, il est bien venu que le client nous fournisse une opinion juridique émanant de ses conseils ainsi qu’une analyse précise du montant des dommages.

En phase 2 de l’audit, les experts de notre collège sont étroitement associés au processus d’audit. Concrètement, cela prend la forme d’échanges entre notre collège, les avocats et le client afin d’affiner au maximum notre appréciation des chances de succès et du montant des dommages notamment.

L’expérience et l’expertise de notre collège d’experts sont aussi au service du client en cours de procédure lorsqu’il s’agira de prendre des décisions stratégiques, afin que, aux côtés des avocats, les meilleures décisions puissent être prises dans l’intérêt du client.

JCP G : Vous énoncez que ce modèle juridique est un moyen privilégié d’accès à la justice. Quels en sont les avantages ?

F. P. : Nous avons déjà évoqué les avantages financiers spécifiques au justiciable qui a recours au TPF. Je voudrais dire un mot des avantages que le TPF peut globalement procurer à la justice et à la société.

En permettant la levée de la contrainte budgétaire, le TPF opère un rééquilibrage des moyens mis à disposition des parties ce qui permet in fine d’engager des actions méritantes, ce qui est économiquement efficace. J’ajoute qu’en matière d’arbitrage la justice privée se finance sur le marché privé, ce qui est plutôt sain en fait.

Ensuite, le TPF permet à travers la création d’un marché des litiges une meilleure allocation des risques entre les acteurs : les entreprises, averses au risque, peuvent transférer aux investisseurs le risque adossé à un litige. C’est là encore économiquement positif.

Enfin, le TPF contribue à solutionner la question d’asymétrie d’information. Trop souvent les justiciables s’engagent à l’aveugle dans des procédures contentieuses longues et couteuses faute d’avoir conduit en amont un audit détaillé des montants recouvrables, des délais et des chances de succès. Notre approche rationalisée qui consiste à appréhender les contentieux comme une classe d’actif à part entière permet justement de conduire les contentieux de manière bien plus efficace et d’aligner les intérêts des parties. Un justiciable pourrait ainsi décider de ne pas engager de poursuites faute de chances de succès suffisamment élevées ce qui est là encore économiquement efficace.

JCP G : Pour la profession d’avocats, ce type de financement peut-il constituer une opportunité en termes de représentation ?

F. P. : Oui. Pour les avocats, le TPF est l’opportunité de représenter des clients qu’ils n’auraient autrement pas représentés. Les avocats français étant interdits de pratiquer le « no win no fee », la solution d’Alter Litigation est un relai efficace lorsque leurs clients ayant des droits fondés ne disposent pas des fonds nécessaires

JCP G : Un vœu en mot de la fin ?

F. P. : Nous avons l’ambition de faire d’Alter Litigation le leader du TPF en France et avons comme objectif d’investir, d’ici la fin de l’année, dans 2 à 3 cas pour un montant de 2 millions d’euros chacun.

Propos recueillis par Hélène Béranger

Less / PDF

OPTION DROIT & AFFAIRES

Alter Litigation, first French litigation finance company

Activité en plein essor dans les pays anglo-saxons, le financement de contentieux par un tiers (Third Party Funding) est encore méconnu en France. Lancé il y a quelques semaines, Alter Litigation est le premier fonds d’investissement français proposant cette solution. Frédéric Pelouze, ancien avocat et fondateur du fonds, présente à ODA son fonctionnement et ses avantages. More / PDF

Pourquoi avoir créé Alter Litigation ?

Cette initiative s’inscrit dans un contexte marqué par plusieurs tendances de fond. D’abord, l’accès à la justice reste difficile pour beaucoup d’entreprises en raison de coûts élevés qui ne cessent d’augmenter. Ensuite, on observe une croissance significative du nombre de contentieux, tendance que la crise a contribué à renforcer. Enfin, dans certains secteurs «contentiogènes», les grands groupes disposent d’équipes dédiées en interne, ce qui n’est pas le cas des entreprises plus modestes qui ont rarement l’expérience du contentieux et parfois pas les fonds nécessaires. Le rapport de force est donc parfois déséquilibré.

Pour la première fois en France, les entreprises ont le choix: financer leurs contentieux sur fonds propres ou bénéficier d’un financement hors bilan sans obligation de remboursement (non recourse loan). En faisant financer leurs contentieux, les entreprises transfèrent le risque adossé au contentieux, renforcent leur trésorerie dans la perspective d’investissements directement créateurs de valeur pour les actionnaires et transforment leurs litiges en de véritables actifs financiers à forte valeur ajoutée. Concrètement, sur un arbitrage de 10 millions d’euros avec des couts estimés à 1 million et un aléa judiciaire de 75 %, l’entreprise a le choix entre dépenser 1 million d’euros pour espérer 7,5 millions et ne rien dépenser pour «gagner» 5,25 millions (dans l’hypothèse d’un pourcentage de partage avec le funder de 30 %).

Comment fonctionne votre société ?

La société est composée d’une équipe de gestion et d’un collège d’experts externe regroupant d’anciens magistrats, des professeurs de droit, des avocats, des arbitres et des experts en quantification de dommages. Lorsqu’une demande de financement nous parvient, nous analysons le bien fondé de l’action en justice, la solvabilité du défendeur et le montant des dommages réclamés. Nous nous appuyons également sur l’opinion juridique fournie par les conseils du demandeur. Si le demandeur n’a pas d’avocats, nous pouvons l’accompagner dans le choix d’une équipe de conseils la mieux à même de le représenter. In fine, la décision de financement est prise par l’équipe de gestion sur la base de l’avis collégial des experts.

Quel type de contentieux proposez-vous de financer ?

Nous finançons les contentieux commerciaux, les contentieux post-acquisition, les arbitrages, les litiges des sociétés en difficultés et les actions en indemnisation à la suite de pratiques anticoncurrentielles. Nous avons à ce titre développé un programme dédié à l’indemnisation des victimes de cartels : Clemency Xtend est la première solution privée globale, inspirée du programme public de clémence, qui permet aux victimes directes de cartels de se regrouper pour agir collectivement.

Sur quelle base vous rémunérez-vous ?

Nous sommes rémunérés uniquement en cas de succès par un pourcentage sur le montant des sommes allouées. Il n’existe pas de pour- centage standard. Ce pourcentage est fonction du risque, c’est à dire notamment du montant de l’investissement par rapport au montant des dommages réclamés, de la durée du contentieux et des chances de succès. Si le contentieux est perdu, Alter Litigation perd la totalité des sommes engagées et le deman- deur n’a rien à rembourser.

Quels autres avantages offre la solution d’Alter Litigation ?

Au delà du financement, nous mettons notre expérience et l’expertise de notre collège d’experts au service du demandeur afin que tous ensemble, aux cotés des avocats, les meilleurs décisions soient prises dans l’intérêt du client.

Pour les avocats, le financement des contentieux est l’opportu- nité de représenter des clients qu’ils n’auraient autrement pas représentés. Les avocats français étant interdits de pratiquer le no win no fee, la solution d’Alter Litigation est un relai efficace lorsque leurs clients ayant des droits fondés ne disposent pas des fonds nécessaires.

Le financement de contentieux a aussi le mérite d’aligner intégralement les intérêts des parties prenantes, ce qui correspond justement à une attente du marché. Enfin, pour les investisseurs, les contentieux représentent une nouvelle classe d’actifs très attractive. Investissements relati- vement conservateurs, parfaitement décorrélés des marchés et offrant des rendements potentiellement supranormaux notamment en cas d’accord transactionnel, les contentieux peuvent se révéler une excellente opportunité de diversification d’un portefeuille. 

Less / PDF

Publications

DROIT & PATRIMOINE

Faire du contentieux un investissement financier

Faire financer son procès par un tiers. Une drôle d’idée. Pourtant, la pratique rencontre du succès et s’importe même en France depuis environ quatre ans, tout en restant très marginale. Dans le jargon, plusieurs expressions sont utilisées pour la désigner, parmi elles : « financement de contentieux par un tiers », « litigation financing », « third party litigation funding » ou encore « third party funding » (TPF). Les Français utilisant tant la version française que celles anglo-saxonnes.

More / PDF

Pionnière, l’Australie a vu débarquer les third party litigation funding dans les années 80 pour les entreprises en faillite avant que la pratique ne s’étende à partir de la fin des années 90 et qu’elle ne prenne réellement son envol en 2006. Cette année-là, la High Court of Australia a reconnu la légalité des litigation funders et leur a ainsi ouvert la porte en grand (Campbells Cash & Carry Pty Ltd v. Fostif Pty Ltd [2006] HCA). Ce moyen de financement y rencontre d’autant plus de succès qu’il permet de pallier la baisse des fonds publics dévolus à l’aide juridictionnelle. L’idée du TPF a été par la suite reprise, il y a une quinzaine d’années, par les États- Unis et le Royaume-Uni. En outre, « grâce à la présence à Londres de l’Alternative Investment Market, l’Angleterre est devenue un peu le centre de l’activité car beaucoup d’investisseurs ont leur base ici », note Maddi Azpiroz, managing director de ClaimTrading Ltd à Londres. En France, l’existence des fonds reste méconnue avec peu d’acteurs – du moins officiels – mais n’est pas nouvelle. Le groupe La Française AM, gérant d’actifs mobiliers, immobiliers et de solutions globales d’investissements régulé par l’Autorité des marchés financiers, a ainsi dès 2010 décidé de diversifier ses services en créant une filiale intitulée La Française AM International Claims Collection. Et début 2013, un fonds entièrement dédié au financement de contentieux, Alter Litigation, a été créé sous la di- rection d’un ancien avocat. Les fonds de La Française AM sont orientés vers trois activités : l’achat de créances commerciales et souveraines à l’international, le financement de procédures d’arbitrage international et le recouvrement de créances internationales. Quant à Alter Litigation, il finance « essentiellement de gros litiges de nature commerciale et non les petits litiges civils tels que les divorces, par exemple », précise Frédéric Pelouze, fondateur du fonds.

Less / PDF

RDLC Droit Civil

Litigation funded by Hedge Funds

What if the best investment was litigation? 

PDF

INSOLVENCY PRACTIONNERS FRENCH INSTITUE

A tool for Insolvency Practitioners

Pour les entreprises en redressement ou en liquidation certains contentieux, et a fortiori les arbitrages, sont fortement consommateurs des fonds propres, à tel point qu’ils sont parfois abandonnés faute pour l’entreprise de disposer de la surface financière nécessaire pour en supporter le coût.

Face à l’impossibilité de rendre ces actifs liquides en raison de la menace du retrait litigieux, des solutions de financement de litiges par des tiers sont apparues et permettent la monétisation à terme et sans risque de ces potentiels flux de liquidités que représentent les litiges. More / PDF

Le financement de litiges offre ainsi une solu- tion externalisation du cout d’un litige en demande à travers un financement hors bilan sans obligation de remboursement des frais supportés par le tiers en cas d’échec. Une opportunité pour le mandataire ou le liquidateur d’engager des procédures sans mobilier de trésorerie, tout en conservant la conduite du procès.

INTRODUCTION

L’Europe connait depuis une dizaine années une croissance significative du nombre de litiges en même temps qu’une augmentation remar- quable des coûts y afférents. Cette tendance de fond s’est récemment intensifiée avec la crise économique.

La conjugaison de ce contexte structurel accéléré par la conjoncture a contribué à accentuer les déséquilibres entre entreprises in bonis et entreprises en difficultés, au détriment des plus faibles. A tel point que la surface financière d’une entreprise est devenue déterminante, surtout en arbitrage, pour faire valoir ses droits en justice.

Les entreprises en difficultés, qui sont de plus en plus nombreuses, sont trop souvent contraintes de gérer leurs litiges au rabais ou même d’abandonner les poursuites, faute de moyens.

Alors même que ces litiges sont pour l’entre- prise de véritables actifs dont les liquidités qu’ils peuvent générer peuvent être significatives, le financement de ces procédures conten- tieuses reste, pour les professionnels en charge d’accompagner ces entreprises, un problème souvent délicat à résoudre. Dans ce contexte,des solutions de financement de litiges par des tiers ont récemment émergé avec la promesse que ces entreprises peuvent désormais faire valoir leurs droits sans mobiliser leur trésorerie.

1. Le litige, cet actif non transférable et illiquide

D’une manière générale, les problèmes de trésorerie conduisent les entreprises qui y sont confrontées à céder certains de leurs actifs afin d’améliorer leur ratio de solvabilité dans la perspective notamment d’un refinancement.

Les litiges en demande représentent un des rares actifs de l’entreprise qui, de par leur nature et l’environnement législatif en vigueur, n’est pas inscrit au bilan et ne dispose pas de solution de liquidité.

1.1. Le retrait litigieux, obstacle à la libre négociabilité des litiges

Les entreprises et a fortiori les entreprises en difficultés, pourraient être tentées de « céder » certains litiges en demande nonobstant l’aléa dont ils sont frappés. La cession d’un litige représenterait pour l’entreprise l’opportunité :

- de monétiser immédiatement la valeur pon- dérée du flux de liquidités que ces litiges en demande peuvent générer dans le futur ;

- et de libérer les entreprises d’un actif consommateur de fonds propres dans la mesure où tout litige nécessite des liquidités pour conduire la procédure.

A l’instar d’une cession de créance, la cession d’un litige à un tiers permettrait donc à l’entreprise de renforcer ses fonds propres, de financer son fonds de roulement ou de pouvoir retrouver des capacités de prêt.

Cependant, les dispositions les dispositions de l’article 1699 du code civil relatives au retrait litigieux anéantissent l’attractivité pour le ces- sionnaire de procéder à l’acquisition d’un droit litigieux. En vertu de ces dispositions, le débiteur cédé – adversaire du cédant – peut contrarier la cession des droits litigieux, en exerçant le retrait que la loi lui réserve : en versant au cessionnaire le prix effectif de la cession, les frais éventuels du contrat et les intérêts au taux légal, le débiteur cédé devient retrayant et le cessionnaire, devenu retrayé, ne peut plus continuer le procès et la dette s’éteint par confusion.

Par ce mécanisme, le débiteur cédé peut racheter sa propre dette à un prix a priori inférieur à sa valeur, la créance cédée faisant l’objet d’une contestation. Dans la mesure où l’acceptation du cessionnaire à cette substitution n’est aucunement requise, le mécanisme du retrait rend purement et simplement la cession des droits litigieux financièrement très peu attractive pour les cessionnaires. L’exercice du retrait requiert toutefois qu’il s’agisse effectivement d’une créance de nature litigieuse au sens de l’article 1700 du code civil qui dispose à cet égard que : « la chose est censée litigieuse dès qu’il y a procès et contestation sur le fond du droit ». En visant la « contestation sur le fond du droit », la loi exige que le droit concerné fasse l’objet d’une négation ou d’une remise en cause. Dès lors que la créance n’est contestée ni dans son existence, ni dans son quantum mais que la contestation ne porte que sur la seule qualité du cédant à agir, le seul calcul des intérêts, ou l’exécution d’une décision, ou encore sur l’incertitude qui existe sur le recouvrement de la créance, la créance n’est pas litigieuse au sens des dispositions précitées et peut donc être cédée sans possibilité de retrait. Dans ces cas- là, l’entreprise n’est certainement pas confrontée à un véritable litige et elle aura sans doute intérêt à en assurer seule la gestion.

Contrairement à un portefeuille de créances que les entreprises peuvent mobiliser à travers les solutions d’affacturages, la loi prohibe donc indirectement la cession de droits litigieux.

1.2. L’aléa, obstacle à la liquidité

A première vue, il est permit de s’étonner que la valeur d’un litige en demande ne soit quasiment jamais utilisée comme assiette, garantie ou sous-jacent pour obtenir d’un tiers des liqui- dités.

A l’examen, il faut concéder que la difficulté d’appréhender les différentes inconnues de l’équation à laquelle répond l’aléa de tout li- tige, participe à rendre cet actif difficile à valo- riser pour un non spécialiste. En effet, ce travail de modélisation est très particulier et nécessite de mobiliser des outils et des connaissances spécifiques.

Si le principe de prudence comptable interdit d’inscrire la valeur pondérée d’un litige à l’actif du bilan, l’aversion au risque et les compétences requises pour valoriser ces actifs expliquent en partie le peu d’engouement vis-à-vis des litiges.

Il n’en reste pas moins que ces litiges sont d’un point de vue strictement financier des actifs. Et que de surcroit, ils exigent de leur propriétaire qu’il engage des sommes parfois significatives afin de conduire une procédure en supportant le risque d’un échec.

C’est dans ce contexte de restriction légale à la négociabilité vis-à-vis d’un actif communément perçu comme risqué que sont nées certaines innovations financières et juridiques qui offrent désormais aux professionnels des entreprises en difficultés des opportunités intéressantes pour monétiser les litiges.

2. Le financement de litiges : le début de la monétisation des litiges

Le financement de litiges consiste à faire fi- nancer par un tiers aux parties à la procédure contentieuse, tous les frais liés à ce litige en échange d’un pourcentage sur les sommes recouvrées uniquement en cas de succès.

Il s’agit d’une solution inédite de monétisation non immédiate des droits litigieux et d’exter- nalisation des couts et des risques qui y sont adossés.

En effet, ayant recours à un tiers financeur de litiges, l’entreprise va pouvoir : (i) bénéficier d’un audit de son litige et (ii) le cas échéant conduire une bataille judiciaire (a) sans impact sur sa trésorerie, (b) en externalisant le risque adossé au litige (c) au profit d’un redéploiement sa trésorerie vers les activités cœur de l’entreprise.

2.1. Bénéficier de l’expertise d’un tiers en matière de valorisation du litige

La pratique du financement de litige a conduit les tiers financeurs à modéliser les litiges au regard d’un certain nombre de critères prédé- finis afin d’en extraire une valeur pondérée des risques et du temps nécessaire au recouvrement.

Certaines situations contentieuses sont rela- tivement simples ; d’autres en revanche sont complexes et nécessitent de conduire en amont un audit juridique pointu afin d’établir le bien- fondé juridique et les chances de succès des demandes.

A cet égard, la justification par les parties du quantum des dommages réclamés, dont l’exi- gence des juges à cet égard ne cesse de croitre, requiert désormais de plus en plus souvent de mobiliser des outils de valorisation sophistiqués et coûteux.

L’appréciation du risque de contrepartie re- quiert également qu’un audit sur la solvabilité du défendeur et que des travaux d’investigation soient le cas échéant engagés, afin de localiser des actifs notamment pour déjouer des sché- mas visant par exemple à organiser l’insolvabilité du débiteur.

Bien souvent, les entreprises, peu équipées en interne et fortement mobilisées par les affaires opérationnelles, renoncent à conduire cette analyse juridique.

Ces nombreux obstacles les conduisent à ne pas réaliser ce travail de valorisation ou à abandonner le recouvrement de litiges jugés trop risqués qu’il aurait été pourtant judicieux de poursuivre depuis le début et inversement.

Un tiers financeur conduira systématiquement ce travail de modélisation indispensable à une prise de décision éclairée. En sollicitant un tiers financeur, l’entreprise bénéficie gratuitement d’une information déterminante dans le processus de décision qui la conduit à arbitrer entre engager sur fonds propres une procédure contentieuse ou en externaliser le cout et le risque à travers un financement hors-bilan.

2.2. Convertir en liquidités un litige, sans trésorerie et sans risque

2.2.1. Un financement hors bilan sans obligation de remboursement

L’opération de financement de litiges n’est pas une opération de prêt. Il s’agit d’une opération d’investissement ou le tiers financeur supporte l’entier coût du litige en contrepartie d’une partie des dommages-intérêts en cas de succès.

En cas de perte du litige, l’investissement du tiers est perdu et l’entreprise n’a aucune dette à payer. En tant que solution de financement hors bilan elle s’avère extrêmement intéressante notamment pour les entreprises confrontées à des difficultés de trésorerie.

2.2.2. Une couverture de risque en cas d’insolvabilité du défendeur

L’insolvabilité du défendeur est un risque auquel font face tous les demandeurs à l’instance. Ce risque est souvent difficile à apprécier et en pratique rarement intégré dans l’étude de l’opportunité d’engager des poursuites que conduisent les demandeurs avec leurs avocats. Si le risque d’insolvabilité est incontournable, il est en revanche possible de l’externaliser. En effet, l’opération de financement agit comme une véritable couverture de risque contre l’insolvabilité du défendeur à hauteur des frais engagés dans la mesure où la défaillance du débiteur n’aura aucun impact sur la trésorerie de l’entreprise demanderesse.

2.2.3. Une couverture de risque contre une condamnation aux frais de la partie adverse

Le contrat de financement stipule généralement qu’en cas d’échec de la procédure, les frais de la partie adverse auxquels le demandeur pourrait être condamné seront supportés par le tiers financeur.

En matière d’arbitrage, il est très fréquent que la partie qui succombe soit condamnée à payer à la partie qui triomphe les frais que cette dernière a engagés pour faire valoir ses droits. Ces montants peuvent parfois être subséquents et venir grever substantiellement la trésorerie d’une entreprise. L’opération de financement agit là encore comme une véritable couverture de risque contre le risque de condamnation aux frais de la partie adverse.

2.2.4. La maîtrise de la conduite du procès

Le financement de litiges consiste en un soutien financier et non en une assistance juridique extérieure. Le recours à un financement par un tiers n’entrave donc pas la liberté de choix de l’avocat. Le mandataire ou le liquidateur conservera donc seul, avec l’appui de l’avocat, la conduite du procès. Il s’agit d’une situation bien différente de celle où l’assureur conduit la procédure et choisit les avocats.

* * *

L’activité de financement de litige, apparue récemment en France, est amenée à se développer notamment vis-à-vis des professionnels des entreprises en difficultés dont la contrainte budgétaire est souvent le talon d’Achille d’une procédure contentieuse.

Less / PDF

LJA MAGAZINE

Ready for Third Party Funding?

Enquête sur un phénomène qui pourrait bien prendre de l’ampleur.

Né en Australie il y a une trentaine d’années, le financement de procès par un tiers, ou third party funding, commence à investir l’Europe. Enquête sur un phénomène qui pourrait bien prendre de l’essor.  More / PDF

Mystérieux Third Party Funding… Rares sont ceux qui savent de quoi il retourne lorsque l’on évoque cette expression. Pourtant, le financement de litige par un tiers n’est pas une nouveauté. La pratique née dans les années 198 en Australie pour financer des contentieux domestiques. Il s’agissait alors de corriger les effets d’une justice trop couteuse. Sans surprise elle s’est exportée aux Etat-Unis, avant de franchir l’Atlantique pour s’installer à Londres à la fin des années 2000. Mais l’expression third party funding recouvre des réalités multiples. Dans certains pays, il s’agit de financer des litiges ordinaires devant des juridictions étatiques. C’est le cas en Australie, mais aussi en Allemagne, où l’assureur Allianz a fait figure de pionnier. Mais il peut aussi s’agir de financer des procédures d’arbitrage. c’est dans ce sens que semble s’orienter la pratique en France …

 

Less / PDF

OPTION FINANCE

Third Party Funding: un cadre juridique à définir

Largement développé dans les pays anglo-saxons, le third party funding commence à susciter un certain intérêt en France. S’il présente de nombreux avantages, le manque d’encadrement juridique de cette pratique semble freiner plus d’un client potentiel. More / PDF

Si la justice française est en théorie gratuite, la pratique montre que de nombreuses entreprises renoncent à lancer des procédures contentieuses car elles ne disposent pas des moyens pour financer les frais afférents ou préfèrent préserver leur trésorerie pour investir. Quant à l’arbitrage, ses couts très élevées ne sont plus à démontrer. Face à ce contât, une solution très en vogue dans les pays anglo-saxons depuis le milieu des années 2000 commence à faire son chemin en France et pourrait permettre à ces sociétés de lutter enfin à armes égales face à leurs adversaires. Le third party funding (TPF) ou financement de contenu par un tier, intéresse de plus en plus d’acteurs de la vie économique.

Ce service selon lequel un tiers à un litige offre à une entreprise d’apporter les fonds nécessaires à la conduite d’un parc!s ou d’un arbitrage, en échange d’un ponction sur les indemnisés obtenues, semble surtout séduire les avocats de la place. Un détail qui n’a d’ailleurs pas échappé aux « third party funders ». « Les entreprises connaissent encore mal cette solution. Nous ciblons donc davantage les avocats car ils sont directement en contact avec des entreprises précisément confrontées à une problématique contentieuse », souligne Frédéric Pelouze, fondateur du fonds Alter Litigation.

Less / PDF

Who we are

Frederic pelouze

Directeur

T. 0033 1 72 60 50 31


Frederic previously worked as a lawyer in one of France’s most prestigious law firms before co-founding in 2013 the first litigation finance company in France, Alter Litigation. Through both his academic background (Paris Panthéon Sorbonne & LL.M. Columbia University) and professional expertise, Frederic has hands-on experience regarding litigation finance and international regulation.

Philippe POELS

Membre du comité d’investissement


Philippe Poels has a leading expertise in litigation matters combined with considerable experience in business. Philippe graduated from Sciences Po and the University Panthéon-Assas. Philippe started his career as a lawyer and joined the legal department of Colgate-Palmolive. He then joined Sony France in 1987 and eventually became CEO; in 2002, Philippe became Vice-Chairman of Sony Europe. In 2007, Philip founded Isope, a consulting company for the creation and implementation of compliance programs. In parallel, Philippe assists Alter Litigation in the analysis potential claims.

Stéphane Benilsi

membre du comité d’investissement


Stéphane is a University lecturer at the Law School of Montpellier. Stéphane holds a PhD in Law and has authored numerous articles, publications and reports on a range of topics in his areas of expertise. He his a member of the Insolvency Law chapter of Trans-Europe Experts. Stéphane is a member of Alter Litigation’s advisory panel and assists in the due diligence of the claims.

Tony Moussa

membre du comité d’investissement


Tony Moussa holds a PhD in Law, is an honorary member and senior judge of the French Supreme Court («  Court of Cassation ») and former associate professor at the Law of School of Lyon, France. Tony Moussa is a leading expert in civil procedure and enforcement matters. Tony Moussa is a member of Alter Litigation’s advisory panel and assists in the due diligence of the claims.

Jean-Christophe Roda

Membre du comité d’investissement


Jean-Christophe Roda is a Senior Lecturer (MCF) at the Paul Cézanne University (Aix-Marseille III), a member of the Economic Law Centre and the co-head of the master of Comparative Law. Jean-Christophe is a leading expert of antitrust law and the author of a Phd thesis devoted to leniency programs in Europe and in the USA. He has authored numerous articles and has a monthly column on American antitrust law in the Revue Concurrences. He has most notably devoted his research in questions relating to cartels (leniency, plea bargaining) and competition proceedings. He is a member of the Antitrust Research French Association ("Association Française d’Etude de la Concurrence") and of the Comparative Legislation Society ("Société de Législation comparée") Jean Christophe s a member of Alter Litigation’s advisory panel and assists in the due diligence of the claims.

FAQ’s


#1 — Cases.

what kind of cases does Alter Litigation fund ?

Alter Litigation provides litigation funding for individuals, companies and public bodies pursuing all forms of commercial cases in litigation and arbitration. For more details regarding the cases we fund, visit the page cases we fund.

Does Alter Litigation fund cases outside France ?

Yes. Alter Litigation is also active in funding cases originating internationally or involving French entities seeking redress before non-French courts.

Is there a minimum case size Alter Litigation will consider ?

No. Alter Litigation looks at the viability of the claim relative to the funding required. If we can’t help you we may find someone who can.

What is the largest case Alter Litigation would fund?

There is no upper limit to the size of cases Alter Litigation would fund.

Does Alter Litigation fund defendants ?

Alter Litigation’s primary activity is to fund claimants. However, Alter Litigation may fund defendants with strong defense. In such case, Alter Litigation would charge a percentage of the amount saved by the defendant, based on the amount originally claimed by the claimant.


#2 — Application process.

Is there a charge for Alter Litigation considering a request for funding ?

No. Alter Litigation, unlike other litigation funds, does not charge administration or similar fees.

If my application for funding is successful, how soon can the funds be made available ?

Funds are immediately made available  because as soon as we approve a case for funding, all the capital required for that case is set aside.

How soon before the trial of my case should I approach Alter Litigation for funding ?

The sooner the better. However, if you have a case now, the best thing to do is call us straightaway so we can discuss your options.

Will Alter Litigation consider funding only part of the costs of a case?

Absolutely. At Alter Litigation, we are very flexible, especially in terms of how we structure funding: if the case satisfies our case criteria, we will find a solution.

Will Alter Litigation consider funding only some of the claimants in a group action ?

Yes. Alter Litigation can either fund the whole action on behalf of the group or offer to fund only one member of the group.

What share of the proceeds will Alter Litigation seek in return for its services?

Alter Litigation charges a percentage of any amount recovered. There is no set percentage. The amount of the success fee is freely negotiated between you and us based upon the risk taken, the size of the claim, the level of costs involved and the duration of the case. At Alter Litigation, the success fee consists only of a percentage of the damages recovered, not a multiple of the amount advanced by the funder.


#3 — Lawyers.

Does Alter Litigation choose my lawyers ?

No. Most clients have obtained legal representation by the time they seek litigation funding. Even though Alter Litigation does not necessarily require a legal opinion prior to funding, Alter Litigation usually expect to be provided with legal advice on the merits of the claim.

Can Alter Litigation help me find a lawyer?

Yes. At Alter Litigation, our team is very well connected within the legal community, in France and around the world, and is accordingly well positioned to find the best lawyer for you and your case.

Does Alter Litigation require that part of the lawyer’s fees be conditional upon the success of the case ?

No, but it is preferable since this has the effect of aligning the financial interests of all the parties – claimant, lawyer and the funder.


#4 — Control.

To what extent does Alter Litigation control my case?

Alter Litigation does not control the litigation beyond monitoring its ongoing investment. Alter Litigation requires that your lawyers provide regular updates on the progress of the litigation and wishes to be consulted on key strategic decisions.

Does Alter Litigation have the right to require me to make or accept a settlement offer ?

No. It is up to you to decide, based upon the advice provided by your legal team, whether or not a particular settlement offer is appropriate. Every decision by Alter Litigation to fund a case is based on number of criteria, one being that the best possible legal team is in place in order to have the confidence the appropriate decisions are taken. Also, most of our funded claimants often value our input because of our substantial litigation experience; therefore we may make suggestions, but you are free to decide whether or not you wish to follow them.


#5 — Litigation outcome.

If the case is lost, do I have any financial liability to Alter Litigation?

No. Alter Litigation only receives reimbursement of the litigation funding provided and a return on its investment from the proceeds of the case. Therefore, if the claim turns out to be unsuccessful and the claimant has performed its obligations, there is nothing to pay.

What if my claim recovers less than Alter Litigation has invested in?

If such event Alter Litigation will be paid for its investment but never more than you recover.

We hope the answers above are helpful but please feel free to contact us if you have any unanswered questions at contact@alterlitigation.com

Contact us.

For more information about our services or the company, please contact us by phone ( +33 1 77 10 49 64) or by email at   contact@alterlitigation.com

Legal notice.

Préambule

L’utilisateur du présent site internet (ci-après le « Site ») reconnaît avoir pris connaissance des présentes conditions d’utilisation du Site accessible à l’adresse www.alterlitigation.com et s’engage à les respecter.? L’éditeur du Site s’engage à respecter l’ensemble des lois concernant la mise en place et l’activité d’un site internet.

Informations légales

Le Site est édité par la société Litigation Group SAS, immatriculée en France (ci-après « Alter Litigation »).

Le directeur de la publication du Site est Monsieur Frederic Pelouze.

L’hébergeur du Site est:

1&1 Internet SARL

7, place de la Gare

BP 70109 57201 Sarreguemines Cedex.

Objectif 

Le Site est destiné à présenter au public les activités d’Alter Litigation, et de mettre à disposition des informations.

Le Site est réservé à l’usage privé de chaque utilisateur. Les informations contenues sur le Site n’ont pas de caractère contractuel.

Le Site, les informations, documents, et données qui y figurent constituent des informations à caractère général et non exhaustif; ils ne constituent pas et ne peuvent en aucun cas être considérés comme constituant un conseil de nature notamment juridique, financier ou autre, un démarchage, une sollicitation ou une offre de services, une offre de produits, ni une recommandation et/ou une sollicitation d’offre d’achat, ni un appel public à l’épargne.

Propriété intellectuelle

Le Site constitue une œuvre protégée au titre de la propriété intellectuelle. Il en est de même des données figurant sur le Site telles que marques, logos, graphismes, photographies, etc.

Le Site et chacun des éléments qui le composent, et notamment les textes, articles, communiqués, images, photos, logos, chartes graphiques, logiciels, moteurs de recherche, bases de données, sans que cette liste ne soit exhaustive, sont la propriété exclusive d’Alter Litigation.

Les informations qui figurent sur le Site sont destinées à l’usage strictement personnel des internautes et ne peuvent être reproduites, ni communiquées à des tiers, en tout ou partie, à des fins commerciales ou non commerciales.

Les présentes conditions générales n’emportent aucune cession, licence ou autre, d’aucune sorte de droits de propriété intellectuelle sur les éléments appartenant à Alter Litigation au bénéfice de l’utilisateur. Toute représentation, reproduction, modification, traduction ou adaptation, totale ou partielle, à titre gratuit ou onéreux, du Site et / ou des éléments qui le composent par tout utilisateur, sans l’autorisation expresse d’Alter Litigation, est prohibée.

Informatique et libertés

L‘utilisateur est tenu de respecter les dispositions de la loi relative à l’Informatique, aux fichiers et aux libertés, dont la violation est passible de sanctions pénales. Il doit notamment s’abstenir, s’agissant des données à caractère personnel auxquelles il accède, de toute collecte, de toute utilisation détournée et, d’une manière générale, de tout acte susceptible de porter atteinte à la vie privée ou à la réputation des personnes.

Il est précisé que des « cookies » peuvent s’installer automatiquement sur le logiciel de navigation de l’utilisateur, permettant à Alter Litigation de recueillir, à des fins exclusives d’analyse de fréquentation et de statistique, des données relatives à la navigation de l’utilisateur sur le Site. L’utilisateur dispose de la faculté de s’opposer, par le paramétrage de son logiciel de navigation, à l’installation desdits « cookies ».

Autres dispositions

Alter Litigation met tout en œuvre pour offrir aux utilisateurs un service et des informations disponibles et vérifiées. Cependant, Alter Litigation ne saurait être tenu pour responsable notamment des erreurs, omissions, imprécisions qui y seraient contenues, des informations présentes sur des pages web vers lesquelles le Site renvoie éventuellement par des liens hypertextes, d’une absence de disponibilité des informations ou du service, de la perturbation ou de l’impossibilité d’utiliser le Site, des atteintes à la sécurité informatique, pouvant causer des dommages aux matériels informatiques des utilisateurs et à leurs données, et de façon générale, de tous dommages, directs ou indirects, découlant de l’utilisation du Site.

En conséquence, l’utilisateur reconnaît utiliser ces informations sous sa responsabilité exclusive. L’utilisateur s’engage à n’utiliser les services du Site ainsi que l’ensemble des informations auxquelles il pourra avoir accès que pour des raisons personnelles et dans un but conforme à l’ordre public, aux bonnes mœurs et aux droits des tiers.

L’utilisateur s’engage à ne pas perturber l’usage que pourraient faire les autres utilisateurs du Site et à ne pas interférer ou interrompre le fonctionnement normal du Site.

 Loi et juridiction

Les présentes conditions générales sont régies par la loi française. Tout litige résultant de l’application des présentes conditions générales d’utilisation relèvera de la compétence exclusive des tribunaux de Paris.

© 2015 Alter Litigation. Tous droits réservés.

Investors.

Alter Litigation invests in a wide variety of litigation and arbitration claims predominantly in France and Europe. Our solid analysis of business, economic and legal risk factors enable us to identify claims that can be funded and resolved for a fair value in a timely and efficient manner. For more information, investors should contact us at investors@alterlitigation.com